Saturday links: cognitive labor

The weekend is a great time to catch up on some of the reading you skipped during the week.  So for all you “time shifters” out there, here is another set of long-form links.

Charles Kirk, “In the end, it is never about the money you earn, but the lessons you learn and obstacles you overcome that will determine your success.”  (Kirk Report)

The case for Apple (AAPL) stock.  (ValueFolio)

Do private equity compensation schemes add to systemic financial risk?  (Epicurean Dealmaker)

Five investment-related books Jason Zweig recommends.  (The Browser)

An excerpt from Todd Harrison’s new book The Other Side of Wall Street:  In Business It Pays to Be an Animal, In Life It Pays to Be Yourself.  (Big Picture)

Five investment lessons from George Carlin.  (Big Picture)

On 3-D printing:  “Nothing disrupts economic equilibrium like a nice new invention.”  (The Psy-Fi Blog)

Seven problems an economic recovery would not fix.  (HBR)

Nine ideas from overseas to help fix the US economy.  (Businessweek)

Five books from TED speakers.  (Brain Pickings)

Why do we allow inheritance at all?  (Megan McArdle)

On the “cognitive labor” required in basketball and jazz.  (Wired)

Why is art always the first program cut from school budgets?  (Modeled Behavior)

The challenges of having to double world food production once again.  (NYTimes)

How to live forever.  (Altucher Confidential)

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