Saturday links: inefficiency and innovation

The weekend is a great time to catch up on some longer items that we passed up on during the week. Thanks for checking in.

Investing

Why financial markets are inefficient.  (voxEU)

Public pensions continue to dive even deeper into private equity.  (WSJ)

Innovation

On the dangers of being too innovative.  (Falkenblog)

Is the world running out of life altering innovations?  (Economist)

Companies

How LinkedIn ($LNKD) broke the mold on its way to 200 million users.  (Pando Daily)

How the ICE ($ICE) went from nothing to the presumed owner of the NYSE in little over a decade.  (NYTimes)

How Google ($GOOG) became a great place to work.  (Slate)

How much is a Google driverless car worth?  (Forbes, ibid)

Technology

What is Act 2 for Siri?  (Counternotions)

Why won’t crapware die?  (Slate)

The private drone industry is like Apple in 1984.  (Quartz)

Why Netflix ($NFLX) never built a “Netflix Box.”  (Fast Company)

Sports

RIP, Stan ‘The Man’ Musial.  (ESPN, SI)

More signs that ex-NFL players are at-risk of brain damage.  (Frontline)

The players perspective on pain and injury in the NFL.  (Esquire)

How should we treat our now disgraced “steroid supermen“?  (The New Atlantis via Arts & Letters Daily)

Profiles

An exit interview with Tim Geithner.  (TNR)

A profile of Aaron Swartz.  (The Verge)

Meet Mark Sweet the king of the sitcom warmup comics.  (LA Weekly)

Psychology

Why you truly never leave high school.  (NY Magazine)

On the role of self-awareness in success. An excerpt from Camille Sweeney and Josh Goshfield’s The Art of Doing: How Superachievers Do What They Do and How They Do It So Well.  (NYTimes)

Education

The US education system is doing better than commonly thought.  (The Atlantic)

Is a non-top five MBA still worth it?  (Economist)

Mixed media

How ‘catch share’ programs are helping revive US fisheries.  (HBR)

Why we we need a ‘McWorld‘ built in Times Square.  (The Awl)

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