Sunday links: asset allocation behaviors

Quote of the day

James Osborne, “When we get down into the nitty-gritty details, there is no way to predict which asset allocation will provide the best risk-adjusted returns this year or for the next ten years. But we can certainly have a say in our behavior.”  (Bason Asset Management)

Chart of the day

The Treasury yield curve is flattening.  (Bloomberg)

Markets

Why you can’t be too bullish or too bearish these days.  (The Felder Report)

A different way of looking at relative strength.  (Adam Grimes)

Falling fees

The days of closet indexers is coming to a close.  (Jason Zweig also Mark Quinn, Pragmatic Capitalism)

Comparing the offerings from all of the emerging online investment managers.  (NYTimes)

Companies

The case for breaking up PepsiCo ($PEP).  (Barron’s)

Amazon ($AMZN) wants to get into the online ad business.  (WSJ)

The core principles of the CEOs highlighted in The Outsiders by William Thorndike.  (Clear Eyes Investing)

Finance

Wall Street no longer attracts the Renaissance kids…and that’s okay.  (The Epicurean Dealmaker, Kevin Roose)

Private equity has a big problem: valuations.  (FT)

Global

Austerity was a huge mistake for the Eurozone.  (Joe Weisenthal)

What are the common factors among economies that stagnate?  (Tyler Cowen)

Twelve charts this week on the global economy.  (Quartz)

Economy

A look back at the economic week that was.  (Bonddad Blog, Big Picture)

The economic schedule for the coming week.  (Calculated Risk)

Earlier on Abnormal Returns

Top clicks this week on the site.  (Abnormal Returns)

What you might have missed in our Saturday linkfest.  (Abnormal Returns)

Mixed media

Peculiar habits of incredibly successful people.  (Morgan Housel)

Why drafting works.  (Seth Godin)

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