Top clicks this week on Abnormal Returns

Thanks for checking in with us this weekend.  Here are the items our readers clicked most frequently on Abnormal Returns for the week ended Saturday, February 16th, 2013. The description reads as it does in the relevant linkfest:

  1. How overpriced were stocks in 1929?  (Crossing Wall Street)
  2. Warren Buffett’s favorite market indicator has exceeded parity.  (Pragmatic Capitalism)
  3. Five reasons not to buy gold.  (Mark Hulbert)
  4. Bring on the correction already.  (The Reformed Broker)
  5. Why do analysts think earnings are going to take off in the rest of 2013?  (research puzzle pieces)
  6. Bridgewater Associates is shifting money into equities and commodities.  (Bloomberg)
  7. Keep an eye on the cyclical stocks.  (Humble Student)
  8. Nassim Taleb, “We’re more fooled by noise than ever before, and it’s because of a nasty phenomenon called “big data.” With big data, researchers have brought cherry-picking to an industrial level.”  (Wired)
  9. Eight reasons city life beats the suburbs.  (Brett Arends)
  10. Seven tips for introverts.  (Psychology Today)

What else you may have missed on the site this week:

  1. Target date bond ETFs and the changing nature of the marginal bond ETF “investor.”  (Abnormal Returns)
  2. A Q&A with Wes Gray, co-author of Quantitative Value: A Practitioner’s Guide to Automating Intelligent Investment and Eliminating Behavioral Errors.  (Abnormal Returns)
  3. Ed Thorp and Warren Buffett on beating the market. An excerpt from Gray and Carlisle’s Quantitative Value: A Practitioner’s Guide to Automating Intelligent Investment and Eliminating Behavioral Errors.  (Abnormal Returns)

Thanks for checking in with Abnormal Returns. You can follow us on StockTwits and Twitter.

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The information in this blog post represents my own opinions and does not contain a recommendation for any particular security or investment. I or my affiliates may hold positions or other interests in securities mentioned in the Blog, please see my Disclaimer page for my full disclaimer.

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  • Tadas ViskantaAbnormal Returns has over its seven-year life become a fixture in the financial blogosphere. Over thousands of posts we have striven to bring the best of the financial blogosphere to readers. In that time the idea of a “forecast-free investment blog” remains as useful as it did six years ago. More »

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