Saturday links: gambling on education

The weekend is a great time to catch up on some of the reading you skipped during the week.  We hope you enjoy this set of long-form links.

Business

A look at the long running battle between shareholders and management.  (The Psy-Fi Blog)

Larry Fink wants to raise the profile of Blackrock Inc. ($BLK).  (Bloomberg)

Bloomberg and Reuters are the future of news.  (AdWeek)

A look at the downfall of Eastman Kodak.  (FT, part 2)

Economics

How “real time economic analysis” could help guide policy makers in the midst of a downturn.  (Economist’s View)

The race for oil.  (Gregor Macdonald)

Technology

The economics of Android.  (Asymco)

The education of Google’s Larry Page.  (Businessweek)

The lucrative business of personal data on Facebook.  (WSJ)

Did you know IBM’s OS/2 is still around?  (Techland)

How Angry Birds, and other stupid games, took over our lives.  (NYTimes)

Inside TechStars.  (Inc.)

Science

Edward O. Wilson on why we humans are so apt to join “tribes.”  (Newsweek)

Can Chicago keep up with the coming rains?  (Scientific American)

Gambling

The psychology of casinos.  (The Frontal Cortex)

Why gambling is moving from Las Vegas is moving to Macau.  (New Yorker)

Psychology

Leadership lessons from Don Corleone.  (Fast Company)

How to reboot your diet.  (LifeHacker)

The case against following your passion.  (naked capitalism)

Education

What is an undergraduate business major good for?  (WSJ)

Can The Minverva Project create a competitor to top universities online?  (Term Sheet, Pando Daily)

History

The rise and fall of bourbon.  (Serious Eats via The Browser)

Who killed Alexander the Great?  (HistoryToday via The Browser)

Why was Mark Twain so interested in Joan of Arc?  (The Awl via The Browser)

Sports

Why are there so few female coaches in the NCAA?  (ESPN)

The fallout from the Sandusky case is still ripping through Pennsylvania.  (ESPN)

Media

A profile of Jack White.  (NYTimes)

How Seth Grahame-Smith became king of the mash-ups and more.  (WSJ)

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  • Tadas ViskantaAbnormal Returns has over its seven-year life become a fixture in the financial blogosphere. Over thousands of posts we have striven to bring the best of the financial blogosphere to readers. In that time the idea of a “forecast-free investment blog” remains as useful as it did six years ago. More »

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